Introduction to Confluence

Confluence is a collaboration software program developed and published by Australian software company Atlassian. Atlassian wrote Confluence in the Java programming language and first published it in 2004, Confluence Standalone comes with a built-in Tomcat web server and hsql database, and also supports other databases.

The company markets Confluence as enterprise software, licensed as either on-premises software or software as a service running in AWS.

Enterprise software, also known as enterprise application software (EAS), is computer software used to satisfy the needs of an organization rather than individual users. Such organizations include businesses, schools, interest-based user groups, clubs, charities, and governments. Enterprise software is an integral part of a (computer-based) information system; a collection of such software is called an Enterprise system.

Collaborative software or groupware is application software designed to help people involved in a common task to achieve their goals. One of the earliest definitions of collaborative software is “intentional group processes plus software to support them”.

In terms of the level of interaction it allows, collaborative software may be divided into: real-time collaborative editing platforms that allow multiple users to engage in live, simultaneous and reversible editing of a single file (usually a document), and version control (also known as revision control and source control) platforms, which allow separate users to make parallel edits to a file, while preserving every saved edit by every user as multiple files (that are variants of the original file).

Atlassian released Confluence 1.0 on March 25, 2004, saying its purpose was to build “an application that was built to the requirements of an enterprise knowledge management system, without losing the essential, powerful simplicity of the wiki in the process.”

In recent versions, Confluence has evolved into part of an integrated collaboration platform and has been adapted to work in conjunction with Jira and other Atlassian software products, including Bamboo, Clover, Crowd, Crucible, and FishEye.

Collaborative software or groupware is application software designed to help people involved in a common task to achieve their goals. One of the earliest definitions of collaborative software is “intentional group processes plus software to support them”.

In terms of the level of interaction it allows, collaborative software may be divided into: real-time collaborative editing platforms that allow multiple users to engage in live, simultaneous and reversible editing of a single file (usually a document), and version control (also known as revision control and source control) platforms, which allow separate users to make parallel edits to a file, while preserving every saved edit by every user as multiple files (that are variants of the original file).

Collaborative software is a broad concept that overlaps considerably with computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW). According to Carstensen and Schmidt (1999) groupware is part of CSCW. The authors claim that CSCW, and thereby groupware, addresses “how collaborative activities and their coordination can be supported by means of computer systems.

In 2014, Atlassian released Confluence Data Center to add high availability with load balancing across nodes in a clustered setup.

Confluence Cloud data is encrypted in transit and at rest.

Two pages cannot have the same title within the same namespace, even if they have different parents. This could prove awkward if Confluence is intended for documentation having repetitive titles.

There is no standard way of adding captions to images, there are only workarounds.

The above is a brief about Confluence. Watch this space for more updates on the latest trends in Technology.

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