Introduction to AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda is an event-driven, serverless computing platform provided by Amazon as a part of the Amazon Web Services. It is a computing service that runs code in response to events and automatically manages the computing resources required by that code. It was introduced in November 2014.

The purpose of Lambda, as compared to AWS EC2, is to simplify building smaller, on-demand applications that are responsive to events and new information. AWS targets starting a Lambda instance within milliseconds of an event. Node.js, Python, Java, Go, Ruby and C# through .NET Core are all officially supported as of 2018, and other languages can be supported via call-outs. However, some run-times, such as the Java virtual machine, may be slower than others to start.

AWS Lambda supports securely running native Linux executables via calling out from a supported run-time such as Node.js. For example, Haskell code can be run on Lambda.

AWS Lambda was designed for use cases such as image or object uploads to Amazon S3, updates to DynamoDB tables, responding to website clicks or reacting to sensor readings from an IoT connected device. AWS Lambda can also be used to automatically provision back-end services triggered by custom HTTP requests, and “spin down” such services when not in use, to save resources. These custom HTTP requests are configured in AWS API Gateway, which can also handle authentication and authorization in conjunction with AWS Cognito.

Unlike Amazon EC2, which is priced by the hour but metered by the second, AWS Lambda is metered in increments of 100 milliseconds. Usage amounts below a documented threshold fall within the AWS Lambda free tier – which does not expire 12 months after account signup, unlike the free tier for some AWS services.

AWS Lambda lets you run code without provisioning or managing servers. You pay only for the compute time you consume – there is no charge when your code is not running.

With Lambda, you can run code for virtually any type of application or backend service – all with zero administration. Just upload your code and Lambda takes care of everything required to run and scale your code with high availability. You can set up your code to automatically trigger from other AWS services or call it directly from any web or mobile app.

AWS Lambda automatically runs your code without requiring you to provision or manage servers. Just write the code and upload it to Lambda.

AWS Lambda automatically scales your application by running code in response to each trigger. Your code runs in parallel and processes each trigger individually, scaling precisely with the size of the workload.

With AWS Lambda, you are charged for every 100ms your code executes and the number of times your code is triggered. You don’t pay anything when your code isn’t running.

The above is a brief about AWS Lambda. Watch this space for more updates on the latest trends in Technology.

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